Care of a Dependent

FIXES 2 Comments

Building Networks for a ‘Good Life,’ Even After the Caregiver Is Gone


Fixes looks at solutions to social problems and why they work.


Twenty-five years ago, when Ted Kuntz, a family therapist in Vancouver, British Columbia, was preparing his will, he went around to family members and close friends asking if — in the event of his and his wife’s death — they would be willing to serve as a guardian for their son Josh, now 28, who has a severe cognitive disability and requires continual care. “Everybody said no,” recalled Kuntz. “They said the responsibility was too overwhelming, and they couldn’t imagine taking it on.”

As a young boy, Josh had frequent uncontrollable seizures. Life grew increasingly stressful, Kuntz recalled, and the family became isolated. “We were in crisis,” he said. “My wife quit her job and became a full-time caregiver for Josh. We were holding our breath constantly; people avoided us because we were angry; our family got worn out by the level of despair and pain we were feeling.”


One more way we can prepare now.  Sorry that the whole article isn’t here, but it’s about how this family developed a Community Network that went way beyond the care of their son.